Mushrooms

(Chanterelles, Porcinis, Hen of the Woods)

Nutritional Information
Excellent source of riboflavin (B2) and selenium. Good source of niacin (B3), potassium and phosphorus.

What To Look For
Look for dry and firm mushrooms with a sweet earthy smell. If the caps are open, the gills should look fresh (they shouldn't be matted down).

Easy Storage and Preparation
Store in a closed paper bag (or in a cardboard container) in refrigerator for several days. They will turn slimy if kept too long. To clean, wipe with a damp cloth. Do not soak in water to clean.

Best Uses
Can be eaten raw or cooked. Can be sautéed, marinated, grilled, broiled, used in salads, stuffed, or used in soups and stews. Especially good if partnered with olive oil, garlic, parsley, lemon, rosemary, pine nuts, wine, sherry, onions, leeks, or rice.

Recipes
Polenta with Wild Mushroom Ragout
Pizza with Red Peppers
Mushroom Risotto




Summer Fruits and Vegetables
Other Vegetables


Arugula
Avocados
Beans, Green
Beans
Beets
Collards
Corn
Cucumber

Eggplant
Garlic
Kohlrabi
Mushrooms
Okra
Onions
Peas, Sugar, Snap
Peppers

Potatoes
Shallots
Squash, Summer
Swiss chard
Tomatoes
Zucchini
see also:  Summer Fruit Guide
Fall Vegetable Guide | Fall Fruit Guide
Winter Vegetable Guide | Winter Fruit Guide
Spring Vegetable Guide | Spring Fruit Guide
 
related links:  FDA's Tips for Handling Fresh Produce



NOTE:
An excellent source contains more than 20 percent of the Daily Value for that nutrient. A good source contains between 10 and 19 percent of the Daily Value.

   Source: Copyright © 2000 by Ellen Haas.
From the book "Great Adventures in Food" By Ellen Haas.
Used with permission of St. Martin's Press, LLC.

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